THE FUTURE BELONGS TO THOSE                                 WHO PREPARE FOR IT TODAY.

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Art Sevada is a bona fide Renaissance man, recognized for his many talents and pioneering endeavors. Today, as the CEO of GRIGOCORP and President of Sevada Productions, both based in Los Angeles, he continues to build on a diverse body of work, as an award-winning artist and entrepreneur.

 

Art Sevada was born in 1972 into a family of renowned artists, in the city of Abovyan, Kotayk Region, Armenia. Inspiration was all around him as he grew up in a household steeped in creativity. By the time he graduated from high school, Art had already mastered several musical instruments, and cultivated a profound appreciation for visual esthetics.

 

After he and his family moved to Los Angeles in 1990, Art studied music composition and visual arts at California State University, Northridge. His formal training would propel him into a flurry of creative work in the ensuing years.

 

Between 1995 and 2000, Art released three albums of original music, including “Palpitation of Soul,” “Years of Solitude,” and “Disconnected.” Apart from composing the lush, melodically-driven material, he had also played all of the instruments and arranged the music. All three recordings have garnered critical praise.

 

In the late 1990s, Art established Sevada Productions, a firm specializing in a broad range of creative work, from graphic and web design to television commercials and software development. Sevada Productions continues to grow, and is widely recognized for landmark projects that push the envelope in terms of content and design alike.

 

Throughout the 2000s, Art also pursued his passion for filmmaking, by writing, directing, and producing a series of intensely personal films that are also noted for their universal appeal. His credits include his trilogy, comprising “As a Beginning,” “Mikosh,” and “The Rope,” as well as “Three Colors in Black and White” — all of which have receivedcritical acclaim in Europe, the United States, and elsewhere.

 

In 2015, Art founded GRIGOCORP, a consortium of entertainment and consumer-product companies, with the goal of developing and marketing a diverse range of inventions. Today, cutting-edge products being made or developed by various GRIGOCORP enterprises range from eyewear, modern gadgets, and electric cars to next-generation apps and devices including SFNX, the world’s first AI psychologist.

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

 

There is, indeed, a host of fundamental issues to consider before taking the rather risky step of beginning to see a therapist: how much of a role do his/her own ego and judgment play in the provided therapy? Which specific school of psychiatry does he/she adhere to, and how does one determine its effectiveness? If, for instance, you happen to be your psychiatrist’s last patient for the day, can you be certain that he/she is actually giving you his/her undivided attention? Or are you just another face, just another account number, supporting your therapist’s lifestyle? 

 

People — even many of those who regularly receive therapy — are understandably skeptical, while countless millions more simply cannot afford the extensive, often decades-long, therapy they need, or thinkthey need. For all intents and purposes, and in most cases, psychiatry has become a prohibitively expensive luxury, and one, which might well lead to an ongoing flurry of questions than answers.

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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introduction

It’s the age-old question: what do I want? By extension, what do you want? What do we, as members of the global human family, want? 

 

Psychology and psychiatry - and religion and philosophy before them — have been striving to provide the answers for millennia, based on the essential assumption that human beings equate the meaning of life with maximum possible contentment in every conceivable sphere of human emotion and endeavor. 

 

Today, in an age of breakneck speed, when the constant deluge of technological innovation is expected to make our lives easier than ever before, we are, ironically, in many ways lonelier, more scared, and more lost than we’ve ever been. It’s not surprising, therefore, that most people seem to be in therapy — or in serious need of it. 

 

Yet given the enormous weight accorded to and placed on psychiatry as a portal of solutions and resolutions, the question pertaining to its own function remains: just how reliable, and ultimately effective, are the proceedings that take place on the psychiatrist’s couch? 

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2049 Century Park East Los Angeles CA 90067

tel.+1.424.222.9790  |  fax.+1.424.222.9890

email: info@ararich.co

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